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CHEM1405 - Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are described below. These outcomes are built from the learning activities in lectures, tutorials, laboratory and independent study. Important attributes are:
  • the ability to apply scientific knowledge and critical thinking to identify, define and analyse problem and create solutions: you will be expected to demonstrate these outcomes on problems drawn from the material presented in the course and to novel situations.
  • the ability to evaluate your own performance and development and to recognize gaps in your knowledge: keep a portfolio of your progress using the 'self assessment tool'
The ways in which these outcomes are assessed are described in detail in the unit outline. When reading this, you should note that the laboratory course is self-contained: material from the lab course is assessed in the lab course and is not re-assessed in the tutorial quizzes or examination.
  • Generic Attributes
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  apply scientific knowledge and critical thinking to identify, define and analyse problems, create solutions, evaluate opinions, innovate and improve current practices
    •  gather, evaluate and deploy information relevant to a scientific problem
    •  disseminate new knowledge and engage in debate about scientific issues
    •  recognize the rapid and sometimes major changes in scientific knowledge and technology, and to value the importance of continual growth in knowledge and skills
    •  use a range of computer software packages in the process of gathering, processing and disseminating scientific knowledge
    •  make value judgements about the reliability and relevance of information in a scientific context
    •  evaluate your own performance and development, to recognize gaps in knowledge and acquire new knowledge independently
    •  set achievable and realistic goals and monitor and evaluate progress towards these goals
    •  appreciate sustainability and the impact of science within the broader economic, environmental and socio-cultural context
    •  present and interpret data or other scientific information using graphs, tables, figures and symbols
    •  work independently and as part of a team and to take individual responsibility with a group for developing and achieving goals
    •  actively seek, identify and create effective contacts with others in a professional and social context, and maintain those contacts for mutual benefit
    •  recognize the importance of safety and risk management and compliance with safety procedures
    •  manipulative equations and measurements with due regard for significant figures and unit conventions
  • Laboratory Skills
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  perform careful and safe experiments
    •  accurately report scientific observations
    •  work as a professional scientist with due regard for personal safety and for the safety of those around you
    •  interpret observations in terms of chemical models with appropriate use of chemical equations and calculations
    •  perform calculations containing concentrations, moles and masses
    •  choose and use appropriate glassware for a given task
    •  choose and use balances accurately and appropriately
    •  present and interpret data or other scientific information using graphs, tables, figures and symbols
    •  work as a member of a team and to take individual responsibility within a group for developing and achieving group goals
    •  actively seek, identify and create effective contacts with others in a professional and social context, and maintain those contacts for mutual benefit
  • The Periodic Table
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  recognize trends in the Periodic Table, such as in ionic radii
    •  understand and explain reasons for those trends
    •  use trends to predict reactivity
  • Introduction to Atomic Structure
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  list the particles that make up atoms, their symbols and their relative masses and charges
    •  recognise how relative atomic masses are derived
    •  calculate relative molar mass for any substance
    •  understand the difference between a Bohr model and quantum mechanical model of an atom
    •  understand the relationship between the four quantum numbers and electron configuration
    •  explain the meaning of the orbital quantum numbers, n, l, m, and the designation of orbitals such as 1s, 3d, 4p, 4f
    •  determine the electron configuration of an element from its position in the Periodic Table
    •  recognise whether an element is a metal, non-metal or semi-metal from its position in the Periodic Table
       
  • The Biological Periodic Table
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  list important building blocks of living organisms
    •  identify essential, toxic and medicinal elements
    •  explain the functioning of metals in the body
    •  think about the consequences of the properties of elements for drug design
  • Stoichiometry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  write and balance chemical equations
    •  use the mole concept for stoichiometry calculations
    •  apply the ideal gas laws
    •  consider partial pressures and their real life consequences
  • Chemical Bonding
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the characteristics of ionic, metallic and covalent bonding
    •  use the difference in electronegativity of two elements to predict the type of bond that will form between them
    •  relate electronegativity to bond polarity
    •  write Lewis structures for any molecule
    •  use the concept of resonance to explain stability
    •  apply the hybridization concept
    •  explain covalent bonding in terms of orbital sharing
  • The Shapes of Molecules
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  use VSEPR to explain and predict molecular shapes
    •  deduce shapes from Lewis structures
    •  determine the hybridization of C, N and O in organic molecules from the geometry
    •  explain bonding in molecules using hybrid orbitals
  • Intermolecular forces
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify which attractive forces exist
    •  rank melting and boiling points according to the presence and strength of these attractive forces
    •  list the factors which influence solubility
    •  explain physical properties of compounds based on intermolecular forces
  • Introduction to Colloids and Surface Chemistry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  classify colloids
    •  explain surface chemistry based on intermolecular interactions
    •  explain the origin of osmotic pressure
    •  calculate osmotic pressures for various solutions
    •  apply osmotic pressure in context
  • Introduction to Chemical Energetics
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  perform calculations using ΔH
    •  apply Hess’s law
    •  explain the entropy concept qualitatively
    •  perform calculations using ΔS
    •  explain and use the concept of Gibb’s free energy
    •  explain the importance of ΔG in biological systems
  • Chemical Equilibrium
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  define chemical equilibrium
    •  formulate equilibrium equations for chemical reaction
    •  perform calculations involving equilibrium constant K
    •  compare and contrast K and Q
    •  apply Le Chatelier’s principle to equilibrium systems
    •  compare and contrast equilibrium and steady state
  • Acids and Bases
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  define strong and weak acids and bases
    •  describe the equilibria between acids and bases
    •  recognize conjugate acid-base pairs
    •  use pH, pKa and pKb in calculations
    •  describe the chemical basis of the buffer effect
    •  use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation in buffer calculations
    •  determine charges in biological molecules which depend on the pH
  • Solutions
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain the origin of osmotic pressure
    •  calculate osmotic pressure for various solutions
    •  apply osmotic pressure in context
  • Chemical Kinetics
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  determine the rate law from experimental data
    •  determine the reaction order from the rate law
    •  use the integrated rate law (for first order reactions only)
    •  use half lifes
    •  describe the collision model of reaction kinetics
    •  appreciate the role of the activation energy in determining the rate law
    •  use the Arrhenius equation to work out the activation energy
    •  describe how catalysts work by providing an alternative reaction mechanism with a lower activation energy
  • Introduction to Organic Chemistry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  understand the basis of drawing organic structures
    •  convert between a condensed molecular formula and a skeletal or line structure
    •  determine the formula of a molecule from its skeletal representation
    •  identify the functional groups in a molecule
    •  appreciate the link between solubility and the nature of the functional group
  • Hydrocarbons: Alkanes, Alkenes, Benzene
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  understand the difference between constitutional isomers and stereoisomers
    •  recognize constitutional, conformational and diastereoisomers
    •  identify whether an isomer is Z or E
    •  predict the major products obtained from the reaction of alkenes with electrophiles (using Markovnikov's rule)
    •  explain the special stability of benzene and why it does not react like an alkene
  • Alcohols, Phenols, Ethers and Thiols
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  explain why phenols are more acidic than alcohols
    •  predict the products of oxidation of an alcohol and give the reagents required to perform this reaction
    •  predict the products of oxidation of a thiol and reduction of a disulfide
  • Amines
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify an acid-base reaction occurring between two molecules
    •  recognize that amines are both basic and nucleophilic
  • Aldehydes and Ketones
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  predict the products of oxidation and reduction of aldehydes and ketones and give the reagents required to perform these reactions
    •  predict the products of the reaction between alcohols and aldehydes and ketones
  • Identification of Drugs and Pharmaceuticals
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify the molecular ion, base peak and daughter ions in a mass spectrum
    •  use the information that IR and UV-visible spectra provide to aid in the determination of structures
    •  identify the number and type of hydrogen environments in a molecule and predict the the number of signals in a 1H NMR spectrum
    •  predict the number of hydrogen atoms in each environment from the size of the signals in a 1H NMR spectrum
    •  predict the number of hydrogen atoms on neighbouring atoms from the multiplicity of the signals in a 1H NMR spectrum
    •  determine the structure of a simple compound from spectroscopic data
  • Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  give the products from the reaction of a carboxylic acid with a base and recognize that this is a reversible reaction
    •  predict the product of the reduction of a carboxylic acid and give the reagents required to perform this reaction
    •  identify carboxylic acid derivatives as acid halides, acid anhydrides, thioesters, esters and amides
    •  give the products obtained upon hydrolysis of these carboxylic acid derivatives
    •  recognize that acid halides are more reactive than esters which are, in turn, more reactive than amides
    •  predict the products that will be formed when a carboxylic acid derivative is treated with an alcohol or amine
    •  give the reagents required for the interconversion of carboxylic acid derivatives
  • Heterocyclic Compounds
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  predict whether a molecule is aromatic
    •  identify the basic nitrogen atoms in heterocyclic compounds
    •  identify tautomers and predict their structures
  • Shapes of Molecules: Stereochemistry
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  identify stereogenic centres in organic molecules
    •  distinguish between different types of isomers, including enantiomers and diastereoisomers
    •  use (R)- and (S)- descriptors to describe enantiomers and identify if a compound has (R)- or (S)- stereochemistry
    •  predict the stereochemistry of compounds with two stereogenic centres
    •  appreciate the role of chirality in nature and drug design
  • Biomolecules: Carbohydrates
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  use Fisher projections to represent the structures of D- and L-sugars
    •  convert between Fisher projections and Haworth representations
    •  identify the anomeric carbon atom in cyclic saccharides
    •  predict the products of oxidation and reduction of sugars
    •  predict the products of hydrolysis of disaccharides and polysaccharides
  • Biomolecules: Proteins and DNA
      By the end of this topic, you should be able to
    •  predict whether the acid and amine groups in amino acids will be protonated at different pH values
    •  predict the pI of amino acids and simple peptides
    •  describe the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins
    •  predict the products of hydrolysis of simple peptides
    •  appreciate the possibility of tautomerism in heterocycles
    •  describe the structural building blocks of RNA and DNA
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